126 Cameron Road
Papakaio 9494
North Otago
Ph: 03 431 7700

News

2017 AGM

Notice of Meeting

Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the Lower Waitaki Irrigation Company Limited will be held at the Lower Waitaki Golf Club on the

20th day of September 2017 at 7.30pm.

Agenda

  1. Welcome
  2. Apologies
  3. Election of Directors – Mr R Plunket retires by rotation and is seeking re-election. Mr P Borrie retires by rotation and is seeking re-election.
  4. Special Shareholder Resolution (see over page)

That pursuant to Sec 207I of the Financial Reporting (Amendments to Other Enactments) Act 2013, that Lower Waitaki Irrigation Company Ltd shall opt out of compliance with Section 201(preparation of financial statements that comply with generally accepted accounting practice) in relation to the accounting period ended 30 June 2018.

  1. Minutes of the previous Annual General Meeting
  2. Matters arising from the minutes
  3. To receive and approve the chairman’s / directors’ report for the year ended 30 June 2017
  1. To receive and approve the financial statements and auditor’s report for the year ended 30 June 2017
  1. To appoint Audit Professionals as auditor for the ensuing year and to authorise the directors to fix the remuneration of the auditor
  2. General Business To transact any other business which may be brought forward per the Constitution of the company.
  1. Announcement of results – Election of Directors.

 

By Order of the Board

Moira Bishop

Company Administrator

Oamaru

Email: moira@lowerwaitakiirrigation.co.nz

Special Resolution of Shareholders

Sec 201 of the Financial Reporting (Amendments to Other Enactments) Act 2013 requires the company to prepare financial statements that comply with generally accepted accounting practice.

Our auditor, Audit Professionals, advised that under generally accepted accounting practice the company should prepare financial statements that are compliant with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

Of course the company needs to prepare financial statements that meet the needs of all readers of the accounts, we are confident the current financial statements are adequate.

It is difficult to see the benefit of any increased level of reporting for shareholders, given it comes with a significantly increased compliance cost, both in terms of accountancy and audit fees.

There is an option under Sec 207I of the Financial Reporting (Amendments to Other Enactments) Act 2013 to opt out of compliance with Section 201. To do so requires, at a meeting of the shareholders, a resolution to be passed by not less than 95% of the votes of shareholders entitled to vote and voting at that meeting.

It will be necessary to pass this resolution at future Annual General Meetings.

If you have any questions in relation to the proposed resolution please contact Fraser McKenzie, McKenzie & Co, in the first instance, fraser@mckenzieca.co.nz or 03 434 7944.

 

Honours presented to Waitaki pair

 

A pair of Waitaki residents recognised in this year’s Queen’s Birthday Honours List were presented with their awards in Wellington last week.

David Higgins (Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit), upoko runanga for Moeraki, and David Finlay (Queen’s Service Medal) received their honours from Governor-General Dame Patsy Reddy in front of gathered guests at Government House.

A citation that appeared in the Otago Daily Times on June 5 said Mr Higgins, who was decorated for services to Maori, never thought he would receive such a high honour for his work.

He was part of the team that took on the Crown and finished Ngai Tahu Whanui’s settlement in the late 1990s – a process his ancestor Tiramorehu began in 1849 when he sent a letter of complaint to the governor of the day.

Mr Higgins, of Palmerston, was the Arowhenua member of the Ngai Tahu Maori Trust Board that lodged the Ngai Tahu claim before the Waitangi Tribunal in 1986.

He was proud of the role he played and said Ngai Tahu had gone from strength to strength since its win.

“We built up a formidable team that presented the evidence. We did it because our ancestors expected us to do it.”

He was a key player in gathering much of the fisheries evidence that was presented to the tribunal and his efforts in leading the Ngai Tahu Fishing Company resulted in Ngai Tahu having a substantial financial base prior to the settlement of the iwi’s claims with the Crown.

His advice for any group going up against an adversarial power was to persevere, stay true to one’s self and have a team of dedicated people.

In 2000, he was appointed as the Department of Conservation’s Pou Kura Taiao for the Canterbury Conservancy.

Mr Higgins has retired as the Moeraki representative on Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu after two terms this year.

For Mr Finlay, his nomination, for services to irrigation and sport, “came out of the blue”.

Great moment . . . David Finlay, of Oamaru, with Dame Patsy after receiving his Queen’s Service Medal. PHOTO: SUPPLIED

“When you’re working hard at something .. you have your head down and you go from day to day thinking about things,” he said.

“You never think that someone’s going to sing out to you, ‘Well done”‘.

Mr Finlay served for 41 consecutive years on the committee of the Lower Waitaki Irrigation scheme and company board and in the 1990s, he helped the North Otago Irrigation Company get off the ground.

“It’s a pain at the start .. it’s not easy, but for the community, the benefit is quite enormous – forever.”

In 1976, he helped to develop the Lower Waitaki Golf Club, where the golf course’s irrigation was “way ahead of its time”, and he served as president for four years. He still marvelled at “the power of the community out there that built that thing”.

He was involved with North Otago Federated Farmers for a “very long time” and served a two-year term as the meat and wool chairman.

Mr Finlay coached rugby at provincial and school levels and held administrative roles for North Otago rugby.

2016 AGM

Notice of Meeting

Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the Lower Waitaki Irrigation Company Limited will be held at the Lower Waitaki Golf Club on the

21st day of September 2016 at 7.30pm.

Agenda

  1. Welcome
  1. Apologies
  1. Election of Directors – Mr M Kingsbury retires by rotation and is seeking re-election. Mr A Verbakel retires by rotation and is not seeking re-election.

 

  1. Special Shareholder Resolution (see over page)

That pursuant to Sec 207I of the Financial Reporting (Amendments to Other Enactments) Act 2013, that Lower Waitaki Irrigation Company Ltd shall opt out of compliance with Section 201(preparation of financial statements that comply with generally accepted accounting practice) in relation to the accounting period ended 30 June 2016.

 

  1. Minutes of the previous Annual General Meeting
  1. Matters arising from the minutes
  1. To receive and approve the chairman’s / directors’ report for the year ended 30

June 2016

  1. To receive and approve the financial statements and auditor’s report for the year

ended 30 June 2016

  1. To appoint Audit Professionals as auditor for the ensuing year and to authorise the directors to fix the remuneration of the auditor
  1. To authorise and fix the directors’ remuneration.
  1. General Business

To transact any other business which may be brought forward per the Constitution of the                 company.

  1. Announcement of results- Election of Directors.

 

By Order of the Board

Moira Bishop

Company Administrator

Oamaru

Email: moira@lowerwaitakiirrigation.co.nz

 

Special Resolution of Shareholders

 

Sec 201 of the Financial Reporting (Amendments to Other Enactments) Act 2013 requires the company to prepare financial statements that comply with generally accepted accounting practice.

Our auditor, Audit Professionals, advised that under generally accepted accounting practice the company should prepare financial statements that are compliant with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

There is an option under Sec 207I of the Financial Reporting (Amendments to Other Enactments) Act 2013 to opt out of compliance with Section 201. To do so requires, at a meeting of the shareholders, a resolution to be passed by not less than 95% of the votes of shareholders entitled to vote and voting at that meeting.

Of course the company needs to prepare financial statements that meet the needs of all readers of the accounts, we are confident the current financial statements are adequate.

The 2015 Annual Report for the company was 22 pages, including 6 pages of Notes to the Financial Statements.

When we compare this to comparable irrigation companies reporting under IFRS, we see Annual Reports of 40 – 45 pages, with Notes to the Financial Statements comprising 30 pages.

For those companies, we also analysed their costs for the last 4 years, accountancy fees ranged from $27,000 – $53,000 with audit fees in the range of $8,500 – $16,000.

In comparison LWIC fees were: accountancy $12,000, audit $3,700.

It is difficult to see the benefit of this increased level of reporting for shareholders, given it comes with a significantly increased compliance cost.

It will be necessary to pass this resolution at future Annual General Meetings.

If you have any questions in relation to the proposed resolution please contact Fraser McKenzie, McKenzie & Co, in the first instance, fraser@mckenzieca.co.nz or 03 434 7944.

SCHEME SHUT DOWN NOTICE

The Lower Waitaki Irrigation Scheme are having a shutdown from Wednesday 15th June until Saturday 18th June to carry out routine maintenance. This will affect all races, those taking water for stock are advised to conserve water and ensure they have a minimum of three days’ reserve storage.

Sorry for the inconvenience, if you have any queries contact the Race Manager Ross Bishop

Mobile  027 445 1123

Irrigation Operator and Manager Training

irrigation-nz-logoIMPROVE YOUR OPERATION AND GET MORE CROP FOR YOUR DROP

Friday 22nd April 2016, OAMARU

 

A mix of classroom learning and practical in-the-field application

Aimed at the farmers and operators of Irrigation Systems

Four modules covering:

  • • Regulation -What you need to know.
  • Scheduling -Tools and technology to improve your water use efficiency.
  • Operation and maintenance -Develop an O & M manual specific to your property.
  • Calibration -Learn how to check your irrigation system.

Cost includes a complete ‘Irrigation Resources Pack’ for further reference and learning.

Venue: Oamaru Club – Severn Street Start 10am – 4.30pm Lunch provided

Numbers limited to 25 – book early

Cost:

  • Irrigation NZ members $295 + GST
  • Non members $450 + GST

Information www.irrigationnz.co.nz/events

Kate Mills 03 974 1425 kmills@irrigationnz.co.nz
Irrigation Operator and Manager Training
Friday 22nd April 2016, OAMARU

Download full Event poster

 

Harnessing the sunshine for record-breaking crop yields

Author Pat Deavoll, NZFamer.co.nz

For Jim (left) and Chris Dennison, irrigation means viability, sustainability and security for their arable and dairy operation.

For Jim (left) and Chris Dennison, irrigation means viability, sustainability and security for their arable and dairy operation.

Farmers talk about growing feed, but North Otago crop and dairy farmer Chris Dennison says he is “harvesting sunshine.”

His world record-breaking crops of barley and oil seed rape were the combination of heavy soils, a coastal environment, reliable water and sustained sunshine, he said.

“Here at Hilderthorpe (just south of the Waitaki River) we get a cool easterly wind which gives a lull in the growing season for cereal and oil seed rape, so the crops can utilise more sunshine.”

Dennison took over the farm from his father Jim in the early 1980s. Traditionally it was a mixed sheep and beef property but when Dennison arrived home he brought with him an interest in cropping.

Consequently, by 1999 the farm had re-invented itself into separate units as dairy and arable operations. These days the 750 cow dairy farm is managed by a 50:50 share milker.

“My passion is really in arable farming,” Dennison said “In the 1990s a UK agronomist visited New Zealand and said ‘we could do a lot better’. ‘You have the best climate in the world so why aren’t you growing the best crops’? Over a few seasons, he taught us agronomy methods that allowed us to do just that.”

In hindsight back, then I wasn’t really harnessing irrigation,” Dennison said. “I was carrying on the same practices as before, but just adding water. I was irrigating to ward off drought.”

Today he feels he is continually learning how to harness water and manage nutrient, genetic and plant protection programmes better.

Hilderthorpe had lifted its game, he said.

Irrigation has allowed Dennison to expand the operation, create some scale and invest in better technology. He uses precision farming technology; for example a GPS auto-steer on the tractors, accurate to within two centimetres, and a combine harvester that maps yield in real-time. This can be dialled up on Dennison’s cellphone.

“Environmentally we can target our inputs because we know within a few per cent what our potential yield will be. We don’t waste any fertiliser or leach nutrients. The Overseer fertility programme shows loss outputs of only two kilograms per hectare on a very intensive irrigated regime.”

Dennison holds two world records for crop production; the Guinness world record for highest yield in wheat in 2003; and in the January 2015 harvest, the world record for oil seed rape. He was also the recipient of the FMG Farm Excellence Awards in 2005.

“We’ve spent half our farming life building up fertility and organic matter and utilising water so the paddocks that only took two tray loads of sheaves are now world class,” he says.

“For us, irrigation means viability, sustainability and security. A small area of the farm is dry and this yields five tonnes per hectare compared with a yield of 11 tonnes per hectare for the irrigated crops.

“I would be in a huge hole if not for the high yields I’m able to maintain because of irrigation.”

Dennison is director of the Waitaki Irrigators Collective, the overarching body for irrigation schemes in the district and chairman of the Lower Waitaki Irrigation Company.

Free Registration to 2016 INZ Conference

Dear Shareholder

 

The Lower Waitaki irrigation Co Ltd have five free conference registrations to give away to the first five shareholders to contact Moira at the LWIC office at Papakaio.

 

Note: This offer is limited to one registration per shareholder.

Contact Moira at the LWIC site office or phone on 03 431 7700 between the hours of 7.30am & 11.30am Monday to Friday

Why Farmers Should Attend:

  • Expo with over 50+ trade displays showing the latest innovations and developments in on farm irrigation.
  • Pre-conference field trips to see what’s happening in the Waitaki region.
  • Farmers Afternoon covering “overseer”, impact on nutrient values on farms and developing optimal on farm irrigation.
  • Great for networking with farmers, irrigators, schemes and industry – learn about what’s going on!Visit www.irrigationnz.co.nz for more information

Dave Finlay “An Irrigation Man”

 

Dave Finlay

 

Passion for irrigation still runs deep

By Sally Rae 7/9/15

Dave Finlay describes himself simply as ”an irrigation man”.

Ingrained in his memory is his time farming a dryland property at Windsor, in North Otago, battling drought and having to sell his sheep in drought sales. It was, he recalls, ”nightmarish stuff”’.

Those challenging times resulted in him later become a driving force behind irrigation development in North Otago.

At 78, Mr Finlay shows no signs of slowing down, as he continues working as a rural sales consultant for PGG Wrightson Real Estate in Oamaru.

But he is standing down this month as a director of the Lower Waitaki Irrigation Company, after a 41 year involvement. Chairman Chris Dennison, who is also standing down at the annual meeting this month, said Mr Finlay’s passion for irrigation ran very deep.

As a director, he was full of new ideas and dynamic ways of dealing with problems and his input would be missed.

His contribution had also been selfless. ”This isn’t about Dave Finlay, it’s about a community,” Mr Dennison said.

Mr Finlay grew up on a farm at Windsor, one of 11 children, and started shearing in 1954, throughout North Otago and into the fine wool growing areas of the Upper Waitaki and Mackenzie.

He then attended Lincoln College, having done well at St Kevin’s College. He chose to do an intensive agriculture course, which meant completing a two year diploma in one year.

Keen for a change in ”thinking patterns”, he found it hard to explain to his mates why he was taking on tertiary study. But he wanted a change and was interested to see what he could learn.

The course included animal health, stock management, feed, nutrition, production and farm management and he returned to North Otago enthusiastic about farming.

A talented rugby player, he also played ”90 something” games for North Otago, captaining the team in 1971 and later coaching various sides, including North Otago.

In 1963, it was suggested that Mr Finlay buy a farm and he bought a 130ha bare land block at Windsor. There were two floods that year, followed by drought in 1964.

It was demoralising for the young farmer, who felt like he was ”hitting his head up against a brick wall”.

The spectre of drought eventually saw him look over the hill to the Lower Waitaki plains, where irrigation was being talked about.

The Steward Settlement water race was completed in 1912 to serve about 2600ha on the plains and the North Otago Progress League had been operating an irrigation demonstration farm, but formation of the Lower Waitaki Development Committee in 1962 was the first serious attempt to promote irrigation.

By November 1969, 156 farmers had voted in favour of the government constructing a $2.25 million scheme.

Construction began in November the following year, the first water was supplied to farmers in September 1974 and all work was completed by March 1982.

The scheme originally irrigated 16,000ha across 170 farms and the final cost was $8.98 million.

During the 1980s, the government undertook a review of its involvement in irrigation and decided the government schemes would be sold to local communities.

The Lower Waitaki Irrigation Company was formed as an unlisted public company in 1989 and it bought the scheme for about $1 million. It now irrigates about 20,000ha.

When Mr Finlay initially saw the demonstration area and what could happen with water, coming from a dryland farm and having been forced to sell sheep, he was blown away.

He and two others bought a 430ha farm on the plains which, at that time, had about 30ha of irrigation with water from the Steward scheme.

When he first shifted to the plains, it was impossible to dig a hole in the ground on the property; the only tools that could be used in the stones were crowbar and pick axe. It was marginal, virgin land on which nothing could be done without water.

But then the countryside began to transform from brown to green with the advent of irrigation in the area. Sheep and beef cattle largely gave way to dairy cattle and Mr Finlay, in equity arrangements, bought additional properties.

The lower Waitaki scheme was largely achieved under the leadership of Sid Hurst, someone who never sought praise, as that was not in his nature. But he wanted water and he got that water, Mr Finlay said.

The government of the day was also directly interested in farming and irrigation and backed it.

There were other changes over the years, not just in land use, but in the move away from border dykes to spray irrigation, for more efficient application.

There were three soil types on the plains and each had different water requirements, which needed to be recognised, he said.

Mr Finlay, who has also been involved with other irrigation schemes in North Otago, said irrigation was not about having dairy cows; it was about making plants grow. Dairying was a good way to utilise the product from irrigation.

His long term vision was to see all of North Otago irrigated and he wanted to make sure everyone was aware of the opportunity.

People’s democratic right to say ”no” also had to be respected, but everyone needed the opportunity to talk about it and every part of the district should have the opportunity for water.

He saw his role as standing up for people who were missing out, and making them aware, and he would ”never give up the fight”.

While he had no real answer why he did that, he said if he was rung by someone from any irrigation scheme in the country and asked for a hand, he would ”go straight away”.

”I just see water as the ingredient that’s missing. Put it there and the rest will look after itself. What the product is will just happen as a result of need. End of story.”

AGM

Notice of Meeting

Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the Lower Waitaki Irrigation Company Limited will be held at the Lower Waitaki Golf Club on the
16th day of September 2015 at 7.30pm.

Agenda

1. Welcome

2. Apologies

3. Election of Directors – Mr C J Dennison and Mr D J Finlay retire by rotation and are not seeking re-election

4. Minutes of the previous Annual General Meeting

5. Matters arising from the minutes

6. To receive and approve the chairman’s / directors’ report for the year ended 30
June 2015

7. To receive and approve the financial statements and auditor’s report for the year
ended 30 June 2015

8. To appoint Audit Professionals Limited as auditor for the ensuing year and to authorise the directors to fix the remuneration of the auditor

9. To authorise and fix the directors’ remuneration.

10. General Business
To transact any other business which may be brought forward per the Constitution of the company.

11. Announcement of results- Election of Directors.

By Order of the Board

Moira Bishop
Company Administrator
Oamaru
Email: moira@lowerwaitakiirrigation.co.nz